Neb. Firearm Deer Season Opens Nov. 16

LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska’s firearm deer season is Nov. 16-24, giving individuals an opportunity to share a hunt with family or friends.

“We should have another great firearm deer season in Nebraska,” said Luke Meduna, big game program manager for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. “With plenty of permits available and excellent deer numbers, there are great hunting opportunities for all ages. Go out with your friends and family and stay safe.”

The Commission has the following reminders for deer hunters:

-- Permits still are available for several deer management units. Buy them at OutdoorNebraska.gov.

-- Cash donations to the Hunters Helping the Hungry program are encouraged so it can continue to feed Nebraskans in need by providing them with venison donated by deer hunters. To make a cash donation, visit Outdoornebraska.gov/hhh.

-- Ahead of the harvest, hunters should locate a check station near their location. Firearm deer hunters and archers harvesting deer during the November firearm season must deliver their deer to a check station no later than 1 p.m. on the day following the close of the season. To find a list and map of check stations visit Outdoornebraska.gov/deer.

-- Lymph node samples to be tested for chronic wasting disease (CWD) will be collected from select harvested mule deer at check stations in the Pine Ridge and Plains management units, and from whitetails in the Missouri, Loup East, Calamus East and Elkhorn units. Learn more at OutdoorNebraska.gov/cwd.

-- Nebraskans who want to donate or receive harvested deer can participate in the Deer Exchange, which is designed to accommodate the additional harvest of deer. It brings together hunters who have a surplus of deer with recipients willing to accept the deer meat. To join, visit OutdoorNebraska.gov/deerexchangeprogram.

-- Hunters should keep safety the top priority in the field by always keeping their rifle muzzle pointed in a safe direction, with safety on, and finger off the trigger, until they are ready to fire. They also should identify their target and what lies beyond it before firing. In addition, all deer hunters are required to wear 400 square inches of blaze orange on their head, chest and back during the November firearm season, regardless if they are hunting with a firearm or archery tackle.

-- Hunters also are reminded that permission is required to hunt on private land. Those who have permission to hunt should show the landowner and land respect.

-- The 2019-2020 Public Access Atlas identifies and consolidates the nearly 1 million acres of publicly accessible lands that benefit Nebraska’s hunters, trappers and anglers. Printed copies are available where permits are sold; it also is available online at OutdoorNebraska.org/PublicAccessAtlas.

Firearm Deer Hunters Reminded To Locate Check Stations

LINCOLN, Neb. — Those who plan to hunt the November firearm deer season are reminded to locate a check station ahead of their hunt. There have been several changes to the list of available check stations since last season.

Firearm deer hunters and archers harvesting deer during the Nov. 16-24 firearm season must deliver their deer to a check station no later than 1 p.m. on the day following the close of the season.

The following are changes to the list of check stations, by region:

Southwest District – Added to the list: McCook Police Department. Removed from the list: Venango, Tin Cup Diner.

Northwest District – Added to the list: Lewellen, DP’s Service Station; Chadron, Ace Hardware.

Neb. G&P Reminds Pet Owners To Be Vigilant Against Coyotes

LINCOLN, Neb. — Owners of small pets are reminded to be vigilant to protect them from possible coyote encounters.

The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission suggests people should haze coyotes away whenever possible to keep them wild and afraid of humans. The following steps will help keep pets safe:

-- Do not approach or feed a coyote or other wildlife.

-- Do not leave pet food outside.

-- Keep pets on a leash, and do not let them roam at night.

-- Keep an eye on your pet and keep it close, even if just letting it out into the yard for a few minutes.

-- In the rare instance that a coyote acts aggressively, get inside a building or vehicle, if possible.

-- If a coyote attacks, lift pets or children and fight back with sticks, rocks, or any other object while you back away.

Most interactions that people experience with coyotes are interactions between coyotes and dogs due to the territorial nature of both animals. Coyote attacks on people are very rare; coyotes typically avoid people.

Coyotes are common throughout Nebraska, including some areas of cities where there is habitat, such as creek bottoms, green space with tall grass, and agricultural fields.

People who observe a coyote showing no fear of humans or have had a pet attacked by a coyote should call Game and Parks at 402-471-0641.

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